Sunday, September 3, 2017

2017.9.3

TEKA RANCH - WHERE THE FUN NEVER ENDS - SEPTEMBER 3, 2017 - SONDAY
We went to early church this mornin'. Vicar Reich was the preacher man. After that we enjoyed brunch with Orrin, Linda, their son Al and his 2 boys.

As soon as we got home, Terry went out to bale hay. The field north of the house is finally finished. Then he headed to the field on the corner. He made a round and thought maybe he could just do the outside rounds of teff grass, but it was too tough. So he raked the orchard grass section of that field and came home. A bearing was going out on a hay rake wheel, so he took it apart and will get parts tomorrow. Then he wants to haybine the last field of alfalfa.

I spent all afternoon in the garden. Such a mess! The tomatoes grew large and viney, but some of them are dying now. I think it's because they are lacking calcium. I know the garden is short on calcium and planned on putting egg shells in the holes when I planted the tomatoes. However, I planted the tomatoes, forgetting about the egg shells. When I remembered, I didn't want to dig up the plants, so I crumbled the shells and put them on top of the ground, hoping some calcium would leach into the soil and down to the roots. It didn't work very well at all. I picked the red tomatoes, the beans, and found all the really large cucumbers,  zucchini, yellow summer squash, and scallopini squash. I fed them to Kevin's pigs.

The squash and pumpkins have vines running all over the place. I have taken to cutting them off if I don't like where they are.

After supper I walked out to open the gate to the back part of the pasture. From there I was going to head west to Lake Alice, but after 2 steps into the grass on the section line, I turned around. Not only were there millions of skeeters, but the grass was really wet.
 This is how the haybine looked after Terry finished putting down the last field. He said the ragweed was in bloom and yellow pollen would fly all over when he hit a plant. The last field is good alfalfa, so the yellow dust won't get any thicker.

Adios.




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